Relative Grading

Hesper
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Relative Grading

Beitrag von Hesper »

There are different methods for relative grading. May i know how the relative grading for SEDC exam would work, and based on what criteria?

svenamann
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Re: Relative Grading

Beitrag von svenamann »

Were does relative grading come from?

Best,
Sven

Hesper
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Re: Relative Grading

Beitrag von Hesper »

I heard from Prof. Eichberg in last lecture that there would be relative grading. Thats where i got it. :)
Zuletzt geändert von Hesper am 7. Aug 2013 17:57, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.

Osterlaus
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Re: Relative Grading

Beitrag von Osterlaus »

What do you mean by relative grading? That the best student, independently from his summarized points, will get a 1.0?

Hesper
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Re: Relative Grading

Beitrag von Hesper »

But that does not mean that if I get 90/90, i get 1.0 and three others with 85/90 get 1.3, There should be some way to characterize "Top Students" and "Bottom Students". I know something like top 10% would get A+, 20% would get B and so on. This criteria i was talking about.

Osterlaus
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Re: Relative Grading

Beitrag von Osterlaus »

A+ is not a valid grade here, and even if noone has more than (let's be creative) 50%, the best student won't get a 1.0...

Hesper
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Re: Relative Grading

Beitrag von Hesper »

Yes, but all these are speculations. I wish to get some official response. :?

eichberg
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Re: Relative Grading

Beitrag von eichberg »

Here (in Germany), we don't have something like A,B,C,.... In general, you'll get a grade between 1,0 and 4,0 and "didn't pass".

However, you can always assume that you do get a 1,0 if you answer everything correctly and you'll pass the exam if you get at least 50% of the exam points. But, in most cases even the very best students are not able to get all points. Furthermore, in many cases it is reasonable to let students pass the exam even if they have less than 50% of all possible points.

(Due to the situation that it is very common that the boundaries are lowered after grading the exams, it is often the case that the best student(s) will get a 1,0 even if they have not been able to answer everything perfectly. Hence, in a sense the grading actually reflects (to some degree) the relative position of the student w.r.t. the other students. I'm not sure, but may be this is what is referred to as "relative grading" in the previous posts.)

What we will do is that we will take a look at the best exams to determine whether it is reasonable to give students a 1,0 even if they have not achieved 100% of all points (for example, it may be possible to get a 1,0 if you have just achieved 85 points). Furthermore, we will also consider whether it is reasonable to lower the minimum number of points that is necessary to pass the exam. (This is completely independent of potential bonuses.)

When we have determined the lower and the upper boundary, the grades between 1,0 and 4,0 are automatically determined. The number of points to get one grade better is always the same. E.g., if you would need 10 points to get from a 3,0 to a 2,0, you'll also need 10 points to get to a 1,0 (from a 2,0).

Does this answer the question(s)?

Hesper
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Re: Relative Grading

Beitrag von Hesper »

Thank you. Thats what i was looking for.

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